Six tips to making a no-budget music video

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A beginner’s guide to quick-and-dirty music video production

If you’re like most DIY musicians, there’s probably not a whole lot of extra cash left in the band’s bank account after shelling out for recording, mixing, mastering, duplication, registering your copyrights, and distribution. But you still have to promote your new record, right?

These days a music video is practically required in order to properly promote an album. And while yes, you could spend thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars shooting a music video, why would you? Especially when you’re at a place in your music career where every dollar counts.

Last week, KCRW (home of the fantastic Morning Becomes Eclectic radio show) premiered the music video for my song “Anonymous.” It’s a video I made for zero dollars in about two days.

It’s no “November Rain” or “Thriller,” but for a video with zero special effects, a crew of one, no budget, and just a few hours to shoot, I’m happy with what we ended up with. Regardless of what you think of the video though, I think I can share a few lessons that will come in handy when you’re brainstorming ideas for your next low-or-no-budget music video production.

[Note: if you’re working with other people to create your video, all the following tips will probably be helpful. If you’re working on your music video all alone, you can obviously take as long as you need to complete it, and be as elaborate as possible with your production. I’m thinking, for instance, of THIS VIDEO by my friend’s Rob and Naomi, which took them hundreds of hours to create on their own terms and timeline.]

1. Get your friends involved

My friend Craig is a filmmaker, so he was an obvious choice to ask for help. He ended up directing, shooting, and editing the video. But even if you don’t have a friend with film equipment or skills, you probably have a smartphone, right? And maybe you can get some friends to bring their smartphones too (which gives you multiple camera angles to cut between when you edit).

Also, if you need actors or extras who’ll work for free, call your friends. I had two of my friends (Doug and Anna of the graphic design team Chicken 3000) show up later in the shoot to play the part of the two mysterious “watchers.”

If you need a crowd, that’s doable too. If I remember correctly, folk songwriter Putnam Smith put out the call via social media to get people who owned cast iron pans to appear in the last scene of his music video.

Or you could even hold a kind of contest for your fans to appear in one of your videos.

2. Plan to work quickly

Here’s the thing about relying on free/cheap help: you want to be VERY respectful of everyone’s time.

A friend might love to hang out for a few hours on a Saturday afternoon, drink some beer, and do a dozen takes or so, but if the shoot drags on too long or if you have to call people back on a separate day, it might start to feel like you’re taking advantage of their time. So don’t.

Whatever concept you come up with for your video, make sure it can be shot quickly, preferably in 4-6 hours on a single day (including setup and breakdown).

3. Shoot in one location, and make it count

I know you have a dozen elaborate sets in your mind, plus a concluding helicopter shot of you at the top of the Eiffel Tower. But yeah, that’s not gonna happen.

You have a lot to worry about already, especially if you’re going to be the main person on camera. Make the production as simple as possible for yourself, for the person worried about lighting and focus, and for anyone else who shows up to help.

Location, location, location! Find an interesting spot (and don’t ignore places in your local region that might have a ton of character), get everyone together, and put all your energy towards making the thing happen — not driving around, coordinating arrivals, etc.

In my case, we showed up at the YWCA in the early afternoon. After an hour or so of setup we still had about an hour of daylight. That served for the first third of the video. Then for the second part of the video, it’s dusk outside so things look darker. For the final third of the video, it’s totally dark outside, which lends another visual feel to the video. So yeah, be aware of the changes in natural lighting.

Also, don’t be afraid to ask for access to locations that might seem out of reach: a monument, museum, etc. You might be surprised by how excited some facility manager or program director gets about the prospect of an artist shooting a video at their location.

4. Come up with one interesting visual element that can carry the whole video

I knew we didn’t have time to alter the environment, add a bunch of props, or have special effects, so that meant I needed one motif that wouldn’t get dull even if I had to repeat it a bunch of times.

So throughout this video I defy gravity, rising up out of the pool again and again and again while lip-syncing the song. To do this, I needed to memorize my song backwards and shoot everything in reverse (more on that process in the video below).

Maybe for you the visual motif is dancing, or slowly getting your face painted, or wearing a ridiculous costume. The idea is to find one thing that works and center the video around that concept. Without this kind of thematic through-line, you might find yourself grasping at straws on the day of the shoot.

5. Keep the pressure on yourself

Both the marvelous and frustrating part of doing things yourself is that you have to follow through because the entire burden is on YOU. Volunteers might disappoint you or they might kick ass, but that’s a big gamble when you only have a few hours to make a video.

In my case, someone needed to sing the song backwards on repeat while falling into a pool. That’s not the type of thing I can rely on a volunteer for, so obviously the responsibility fell to me. Which at the very least meant that if the video sucked, I couldn’t blame anyone but myself.

I think, unless you’re sure that the other people involved in the production are really committed and willing to put in dozens of hours, it’s probably a good idea to handle the heavy-lifting yourself in terms of acting, stunts, or anything else that requires a lot of preparation. Which brings us to…

6. Prepare

If your band members are going to choreograph a dance routine involving treadmills for your video, well you better practice, practice, practice. Need a couple dozen stuffed cats for your set? Start gathering those furballs early. The shoot will be a disaster if you aren’t prepared to execute the concept.

For me it meant reversing the audio of my track, taking phonetic dictation of the lyrics, figuring out how to mouth those sounds in a believable way, and then memorizing it all. It was tedious, but ultimately I showed up ready to go. When everyone is prepared, you can really focus your energy and get the best out of everyone involved.

Bonus tips

* Be ready to edit the video yourself.

I was lucky that Craig had the time and interest to edit the footage, but he was also very busy around then and I was prepared to take the footage and edit it myself if he got swamped with other commitments. Of course that means you’ll need iMovie, FCPX, or some other consumer editing program. But it’s probably a good idea to familiarize yourself with video editing anyway.

* Discuss everyone’s involvement beforehand.

Things can change along the way, of course, but it’s a good idea to iron out everyone’s responsibilities ahead of time: who’s editing, who’s bringing snacks, who’s in charge of wardrobe, etc.

* Promote that video!

Take stills during the shoot to share on social media. Capture some extra footage for a behind-the-scenes video. And when the final video is ready, do all the usual things: email your fans, promote on social, tease it on Instagram, and mention it at shows. For extra points, do a blog premiere or host a live-premiere event.

Well, that’s my perspective on making a music video the quick-and-dirty way.

Got any tips of your own to share on video production?

Have you made a no-budget music video that you’re proud of? I’d love to see it.

Leave a link or comment below.

For some advice on camera technique and lighting during a no-budget music video shoot, check out “The Anatomy of a DIY Music Video.”

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In this article

Join the Conversation

  • Nathalie Kraemer

    Thanks Chris for sharing this! I actually did a zero dollar music video for my release and it turned out cool but there was no planning, no storyboarding, and also no promo on social media. “Everything You Are”—> https://youtu.be/ZnpSWIo0v68

    BUT THEN for my next single (which was released last night actually haha) I put a lot more pre-production into it. I can’t stress enough how important it is to network. I attend free seminars, go to friends outings (I have a lot of film and photography friends and work as a graphic designer so I’m connected in that area), exchange contacts, read a lot of blogs, go to open houses of studios, etc. As it happens one of my friends was an editor 3 years ago and worked his way up to the director of the Canadian Food Network. And he agreed to direct my music video for far less than it would have cost us. I did invest some money into this video because I wanted to raise the bar visually. Like, the camera we used was a phantom so we had to rent that, then book the studio, rent gear, etc. ALSO, guys, look into funding like MuchMusic and FACTOR. A friend of mine works at FACTOR and she told me that artists can write their own application and have gotten funding before but I guess it does help to have a manager or hire a grant writer to maximize your chances of getting a grant. I hadn’t applied for it because I wanted to do it my way and I had saved up from my day job. So then, we worked out the video, from storyboard to visual reference to timing out the scenes and we all did it in one day in one location at the studio. I paid to have animals on set but I guess you could always reach out to companies or costume makers or the animal wranglers and ask them if they would like to lend their stuff for free to be advertised in your music video. I’m certainly doing that right now with my new project I’m working on. Plus, the more people you get involved in working on your music video, the more people you will have promoting your music video in the end because they were part of it and they’ll gladly share it on their social media. I hired a friend of mine on set to take behind the scenes photos. So while the music video was being edited I promoted the video on social media with those gorgeous photos. Set the release date with keeping in mind that you have to do some reaching out to press and media. I got a press release and EPK together and sent it out to music blogs, press and media (focusing on staying local in Toronto) a month before the release date of the music video. Then look into campaigns. I did a sticker campaign, and invested some dollars into online advertising. There are some cool tools like sitescout.com that focus on ads on social platforms, youtube, etc.

    And this is the result: https://youtu.be/lUpyrZLD0gw

    I hope my experience and tips helped!
    xo
    Nathalie

    • Cool. Thanks for sharing. That new video looks sharp! (Though I like the vintage feel of the older one too). Good point about the more people involved, the more people to share the video. (As long as you’re okay with all the coordination during production).

      @ChrisRobley

  • Tom Hendricks

    Those are fine tips. I went the other way. I made the worst video ever made, on purpose to protest. I am protesting the million dollar budgets of a handful of musicians, that control way too much of the music business.

    The indie musician, Hunkasaurus, has purposely made the worst video ever – he didn’t even comb his hair – with simple solid fun music to challenge the over produced generic corporate music of the sound alike pop stars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZvMa2f33Wc

    The Texas Video Showdown is one indie musician representing all musicians, versus the Pop Stars, Swift, Perry, Cyrus, Beyonce, Bieber, 1D etc.

  • Tom Hendricks

    Those are fine tips. I went the other way. I made the worst video ever made, on purpose to protest. I am protesting the million dollar budgets of a handful of musicians, that control way too much of the music business.

    The indie musician, Hunkasaurus, has purposely made the worst video ever – he didn’t even comb his hair – with simple solid fun music to challenge the over produced generic corporate music of the sound alike pop stars.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZvMa2f33Wc

    The Texas Video Showdown is one indie musician representing all musicians, versus the Pop Stars, Swift, Perry, Cyrus, Beyonce, Bieber, 1D etc.

  • Jungle Gym Jam

    For this kids video “Too Big to Jump on the Bed” I invited parents to send me clips of their kids jumping on the bed, sofa or trampolie and I put the video together with the clips I received. Parents loved seeing their kids in the video and shared it at rates beyond what my professionally directed videos got. The entire budget was complimentary CDs pre-release for the families who participated.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NVefzU4DtE

  • marycigarettes

    that’s the best advice…i smiled reading the bit about not wasting friends time…they get bored quickly…here’s one of mine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMIQ2tFPqKA

  • Leo Brodie

    My approach is more like what Postmodern Jukebox does – my video shows me in the process of recording my song. I do it all myself: engineer, light, shoot, and perform. https://www.youtube.com/embed/zFniuOaIYWQ

  • FullCatastrophe

    We just released a zero budget music video – actually, all our videos are zero budget. It honestly helps, I think, because you are forced to get creative. For our video for “Tom Hanks”, we got a lot of help from our university. We used the school’s studio, cameras, lights and props for free, and had help from the university dance team. They were amazing.
    https://youtu.be/43hHzXlo4Bo
    https://youtu.be/Lc7Wq6sFoOo

    • Yeah, it’s kinda fun to dream something up in that problem-solving way: gotta make this with no money! And thanks for sharing your videos. Good idea to recruit the local college resources and dancers.

      @ChrisRobley

  • That is a good summary. We made a few no-budget videos for our band this way. I learned a lot with each one so the videos got more elaborate.

    The first ones were simply videos of us playing our song. Very boring but easily done.
    This one was my first attempt of a video with different scenes:
    https://youtu.be/po2xYxLqVSg

    For our latest video my band mate made drawings of the story and I put them together in Photoshop and movie maker, mixed with scenes of us playing.
    https://youtu.be/sW4UONgsSL0

    We had a lot of fun with both videos and I see it as kind of an artistic and creative challenge to produce no-budget videos.

    Thank you for your posts!
    Greetings from Germany
    Katja

  • Mike Procyshyn

    If you have loads of time… extra sanity, and patience… This is what I did.
    Used a toy muppet kitchen, built the puppet with fimo and wire. Took hundreds (if not thousands of still photos) as well as had the puppet movable for the mouth sync.

    https://youtu.be/qp5WjTffUoM

  • Victory! Victory!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JSaVuRpDI_c

    Made with iPhone 5c edited in imovie on Mac mini

    my Lady did the shooting and treatment I did the editing 🙂

  • Looking at this from a different angle …. how about filmmakers using free stock music footage and eliminating musicians because it is cheaper that way — or use drag and drop music maker — again eliminating musicians.
    You might want to hire a professional in your same career position and maybe later they’ll use you to do their music for a film they are doing.

  • Mike Procyshyn

    If you have loads of time… extra sanity, and patience… This is what we did.
    Used
    a toy muppet kitchen, built the puppet with fimo and wire. Took
    hundreds (if not thousands of still photos) as well as had the puppet
    movable for the mouth sync.

    https://youtu.be/qp5WjTffUoM

  • Kelly Nash

    Thanks Chris for sharing some great insight! Truly needed for our next project which is a narrative type video. But for this one we had a ton of footage from our tour over 30 days so we spliced it all together to give a nice montage type feel to this video. There’s no real subject matter or focus other than the 3 of us and all the work we put in to make the EP and play a ton of shows in weird places sometimes. Other than the tour itself, the video cost nothing, only time to arrange the footage. This is “Stop looking at me” by Skymonk from Columbia, SC. Enjoy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPin9CxxxH8

    • Another good way to put a video together: the tour retrospective! Was it a pain to compile and log all the footage?

      @ChrisRobley

      • Kelly Nash

        It really wasn’t that bad. I’m fairly meticulous to begin with so all the footage was labeled at least by the day, I did have to watch a lot of footage to get decent, action, funny, or at least interesting shots. It was an easy way to make a video with no budget

  • Terry Thomas

    Great article. The key is getting the idea. Here’s a video I did for my band which also had a zero budget, except a bit of gas money to get to locations. It shows what you can do with a bit of imagination, a DSLR camera and some good editing/FX software.

    https://youtu.be/blX0jbux03o

  • curusm

    Very helpful article. I once shot a no budget video for my first album back in 2010. It was actually shot during the album cover photo shoot showing some of the different sets and looks. I’ve posted a link here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9a2ceIDxJ3I

  • Paul Halvey

    Good guidelines for shooting videos. Even better than going low tech is going no tech. Here’s an example. Shot in sequence so there was very little editing and no cost.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nt1lXucRUps

    • Wow. How long did that take, and did you illustrate yourself?

      @ChrisRobley

      • Paul Halvey

        Drawing and shooting are done together. Six hours. Editing was in iMovie. Maybe three hours. Time can be easily broken and spread over days for a rainy weekend project. But the image idea and sequences: lots of planning beforehand. Here’s one based on one picture…https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Vxn5OZ3IRpI

      • Paul Halvey

        Drawing and shooting are done together. Six hours. Editing was in iMovie. Maybe three hours. Time can be easily broken and spread over days for a rainy weekend project. But the image idea and sequences: lots of planning beforehand. Here’s one based on one picture…https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Vxn5OZ3IRpI

  • Thanks Chris for sharing this, some brilliant tips. Cool video by the way. I was faced with the same problem last year we had finished our mixes of our new album “Stonehenge Welcomes careful drivers” and we had no money left to make videos. So I hit upon the idea of a stop frame animation I had stuff (junk) lying around, like a white Les Paul Cigarette lighter that I’ve had for years that my parents bought me when I was barely a teenager. I used a really cheap tablet to film it, I cannibalized a broken PC power supply and fixed it to a mic stand it locked the tablet in place. Though I had no money one commodity I had was time. I was really happy with the end result now I recommend if you have cats or dogs to lock them out of the animation room. My cats were the cause of a lot of restarts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQHxWP_RnMw

  • Jeff Elbel

    Can you do multi-camera editing in iMovie?

    • I think it’s pretty limited, which is why I ended up switching to Final Cut. But I’m far from an editing expert so I might just have missed something with iMovie.

      @ChrisRobley

      • Jeff Elbel

        Thanks, Chris. I’m not a video guy, but need to become one for similar reasons. I had heard that multi-camera was removed from Final Cut (seems inexplicable to me), but if it’s back, I’ll be looking into it. Great video project you made, and a very fine song indeed. Best wishes.

      • Jeff Elbel

        Thanks, Chris. I’m not a video guy, but need to become one for similar reasons. I had heard that multi-camera was removed from Final Cut (seems inexplicable to me), but if it’s back, I’ll be looking into it. Great video project you made, and a very fine song indeed. Best wishes.

        • Thanks! The version of Final Cut I have definitely has multi-camera editing functions. Hopefully they haven’t removed it in the latest version.

          @ChrisRobley

  • Ron Free

    Good stuff Chris! I don’t own a video camera right now so I’ve been producing videos of my songs using personal, privately permitted, and Creative Commons licensed photos and video clips. YouTube lets you search Creative Commons images and sound effects in the Creative Studio area. Also, Archive.org and Vimeo.com provide Creative Commons searches.
    Here’s my latest:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi-Vq5fEo_g&feature=youtu.be
    All reader’s please feel free to share it.

  • marycigarettes

    that was the best advice..the bit about being respectful of friends time made me smile…they get bored…gotta do it quickly…here’s one of mine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbG-iCYx3-s

    • Tony Rey

      Very elegant…nice job of coming up with simple ways to act out the lyrics.

  • Christopher Reeve

    Great tips! I couldn’t agree more. Here is my first zero budget video I did a few years ago. https://youtu.be/3agSS4jvjWA

  • Derek Cohen

    This is one that I made for my kid’s song. His friend met us at the mall. I
    filmed them acting it out 6 times, each from a different angle. The whole thing took about an
    hour to film. The editing probably took another couple hours. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezfFZz8ceWw

  • Great story. I did something very simular myself. “Jello”.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_QHJx-Bo8s

  • Robert Hanlon
  • Brona McVittie

    Thanks Chris, that was really inspiring. Love the reverse thing. It’s nice to see imagination rule over budget…here is my zero budget video…a slightly different approach https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3F_-lPv0m0

  • We made this video with a chalkboard, a photocamera, and a lot of time for the girl, Arianne Notenboom, writing all those beautiful handlettering on the chalkboard from the lyrics of my song. I did the editing by myself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_D4H9NXDLo

  • We made this video with a chalkboard, a photocamera, and a lot of time for the girl, Arianne Notenboom, writing all those beautiful handlettering on the chalkboard from the lyrics of my song. I did the editing by myself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_D4H9NXDLo

    • mikehalloran

      I love that!

  • Thanks Chris for sharing your tips. Cool video, by the way. After my band finished mixing our latest album we had no money left to make a video for our first release track “I dream of you” so we decided to make a zero dollar music video by employing stop frame animation we didn’t have money, but we did have time and stuff lying around. The Les Paul guitar is actually a 3 inch cigarette lighter used a cheap tablet up on a mic stand to painstakingly take all the stills to make this animation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQHxWP_RnMw

    • Tony Rey

      Nice! I had a plan to do a stop motion thing using paper figures with movable limbs on a big piece of black construction paper. I spent many hours working on the cutouts but ultimately never got a chance to go through with it because I was already working on the next album before I finished the cutouts. Maybe someday in the future when I do a reissue 🙂

    • Estevez Atya

      amazing miniatures 🙂

  • Thank you for this post I am definitely a fan of the zero budget approach

    I made this zero budget Video. I had no camera man so I used a tripod. Editing, Green screening, Color grading and other effects I did in Blender.

    I am impressed in what can be achieved in Blender. However the video is receiving a high down vote ratio and if it continues in this pattern I will take the hint and remove it from youtube.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOfCNbKV4j4

  • That’s a GREAT video! I’m always inspired when people manage to do so much with so little budget! I also love one-take videos as well. All 6 of your tips were in FULL effect when I was shooting this one. You have to work quickly especially when you have a larger cast – and ESPECIALLY again when small children are involved. The only expenses were a few bucks for some props and art supplies from the Dollar Store, paying a videographer/editor (who still worked REALLY cheap as a favour) and pizza and beverages for everyone. Still very proud of this one…..

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wXMmpnuifA

    • Cool. I like the setting. Good lighting too.

      @ChrisRobley

      • Thanks! Not as imaginative as yours though. We found a local theatre company who has a room that is basically a huge black rectangle with chalkboard walls they rented out for $10 per hour. The fact that the entire room was basically a light-sink plus the crappy lighting IN the room gave us what we ended up with. I wish I could say it was planned out that way though…

  • Check out my no budget video.
    “Bless The USA” by Nate Smoove
    http://youtu.be/KA8jRtYSxSo

  • Check out my no budget video.
    “Bless The USA” by Nate Smoove
    http://youtu.be/KA8jRtYSxSo

  • Cool video (and nice song), Chris! You asked for examples, so here’s mine. We shot Those Darn Accordions’ video for “My Friend Jim” with a budget of almost zero dollars — our only expenses were for pizza and beer (which we used as props).

    A friend (Bret Hagen of Hawk Attack and The Electric Boogie Dawgz) played the lead role in the “story” segments and the “performance” shots were taken on a day off on the road in Wisconsin. This was a decade or so ago, so we shot everything on digital videotape and I edited it in a free program. I’m sure it would look a million times better just using an iPhone 6 Plus, but we were pretty happy with the results at the time.

    https://youtu.be/qk4AbD0a0R0

  • Just this friday, I finished my stop-motion-lyric video. I made all the drawings myself, I scanned them and edited them with photoshop. I think a great way to make a low budget video is to use something else you do well in a video. In my case, I can draw reasonably well, so I used that in the video. I really underestimated the time it would cost me though, so be mindful of that. The song is dutch so you probably won’t be able to understand it, but anyways – this is the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysDo6l2vvFA

  • Great stuff Chris! We’ve made all of our videos this way. One camera, one afternoon and a few friends willing to help out. The simpler you make your idea the better it usually turns out

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/YqIjc-mmVEc?rel=0

  • joepotato

    I know a guy who knows a guy that made a real cheezy video…. Not for fans of Hillary…..
    http://youtu.be/FU4MVTdckXU

  • Excellent example of “Work with what you have!”

    @ChrisRobley

  • Here is another zero budget video I drew the scenes up in Adobe Illustrator (took me absolutely ages) then edited, zoomed in and out to create movement.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36_dk6OqtdM

  • Nice. Great lighting! One side-light, and one behind?
    Thanks for sharing.

    @ChrisRobley

  • Hi there, I made this home made music video for one of my tracks using just a webcam a few years ago. 3/4 days of filming and editing for zero cost. Cheers. Kris.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YznQ_iL4Oj0

  • Shannon Hurley

    Great tips, Chris! Your song has a cool Brendan Benson vibe. My band Lovers & Poets recently shot a super low budget music video. We paid our videographer friend $100 to shoot the band for a couple of hours. I downloaded the free trial of Final Cut Pro and edited it myself. We’ll be releasing “You + Me In The Summer” shortly after our album drops on May 6th.

  • Shannon Hurley

    @ChrisRobley:disqus Here is our music video for “You + Me In The Summer” (the video that we shot in one afternoon with the help of a friend). We paid her $100 and we drove around Pacific Palisades and Topanga for some beach-y sunset scenes and some eclectic enclaves. We even stood in a field of frogs that started croaking as soon we were rolling (see if you can tell which scene that happened!) https://youtu.be/OUbLEBDD6a8

  • it is often a matter of finding the right place and time where there is a match between the lyric and feeling of the song with the video scenes,

    if you do not have money to pay everyone who will be involved in the production of a video It looks professional, but this is recorded with a camera of a cell phone.

    https://vimeo.com/166355319

  • Samuel Traquina

    I just found this article and considered it funny when I read your fourth tip, because I realized I had done just that in my no-budget video:
    – crew of 4: actor, actress, me and a friend (who’s a designer/photographer)
    – wrote, directed, edited and post-produced it myself
    – both me and the friend did camera work and cinematography
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_wpoNGuYTE

  • Very nice! Fun tune too.

    Did you use any apps, special filters when editing, etc? How did you do the kaleidoscope effect?

    @ChrisRobley

  • Julio Aguiar

    Awesome hints. This is our zero budget video. Totally “work with what you have” because it was shot home.
    If you like it , please follow us

    http://www.facebook.com/mobiledrinkoficial

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czcX6l_GkfQ

  • Beaky Jay Production

    All Stoneygate videos so far have been made without a video camera. As well as a couple of very basic lyric videos, I’ve made these two. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpKWc4ZVMd8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BWvQvXvG9k

  • Nice! Thanks for sharing, and I’m glad the articles have been helpful. I hear you about that editing process. It always feels like I’m starting from scratch.

    @ChrisRobley

  • Haha. That’s an important goal for all music videos, not harming children. And thanks for your kind words about my video.

    Follow on Twitter: @ChrisRobley

    • Tom Eastland

      Agreed: music and videos are much better for healing than harming!

  • Nice. And forgive my ignorance, but what kind of instrument is that? The one that looks like a lute being played like a cello?

    Please follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, or Spotify.

  • Very cool.

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  • dario trapani

    Hi Chris, I found your post very inspiring, I started from here.
    Here’s what I finally came up with for my band Elg Ler, zero budget.
    A friend gave me one 5 second clip she filmed with her camera, and I came up with this using Ken Burns and hysteric cuts on iMovie. Hope you like it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6Ven-_czZg