How indie musicians can monetize music on Facebook

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Facebook music monetization for indie artists: What you need to know!

Big news: Facebook has been inking deals with labels, publishers, and other rights administrators in order to properly monetize music usage across the still-dominant social media platform, plus Instagram and Oculus. If you’re an independent artist, label, or songwriter, CD Baby  has got you covered for all three of those platforms.

CD Baby clients have already seen enormous value in collecting royalties for the usage of their music on YouTube via Content ID, and we can expect the same thing with Facebook. Think of it: all those videos people have posted to Facebook over the years containing your music can now earn you money.

With the massive amount of music being used on Facebook, and with the introduction of a system-wide solution to help avoid copyright issues, this is going to be huge for the music industry — and it’s not just a win for the majors; independent artists and songwriters will greatly benefit too.

If you’re a CD Baby artist, it’s easy to start collecting money for your music on Facebook

IMPORTANT: a lot of reports out there are encouraging artists to “act fast,” with messages that suggest you only have a limited window to opt in to a direct license with Facebook, or urging you to create a new account with some third party where you have to add all your release info to yet another database.

Once Facebook starts paying, many existing CD Baby clients won’t even have to lift a finger to start collecting revenue. More to the point, you don’t have to do anything else assuming you’re already taking advantage of CD Baby’s YouTube Monetization Program and CD Baby Pro Publishing.

CD Baby can help you earn money from your music on Facebook in two ways

Depending on your contribution to the music, there are two different Facebook revenue streams that artists and songwriters can tap into. To make sure that your music is usable on Facebook and you’re collecting all applicable royalties, take advantage of:

There are two rights at play when your music is used on Facebook

The sound recording

Whenever your song is used (on ANY video on Facebook, not just ones you’ve uploaded to your page or profile), a royalty is owed to the owner of the actual recorded track.

If you’re already taking advantage of CD Baby’s YouTube Monetization Program, your music will also be set up to collect revenue from Facebook as soon as they start paying.

The composition

Any time a sound recording is used on Facebook, the underlying song composition should also generate a royalty. This money will be owed to publishers/songwriters.

If your publishing rights are already being administered by CD Baby Pro Publishing, we’ll collect those royalties for you as soon as Facebook starts paying. If you’re not, upgrade today!

As a Pro client, we’ll also help you earn publishing revenue that is almost impossible for independent artists to collect on their own, including royalties for:

  • global streaming activity
  • international downloads
  • YouTube plays
  • and more

Again, Facebook hasn’t started paying rights holders yet, but with CD Baby you’re at the front of the line, and you’ll be positioned to earn money from the social media service as soon as possible (as long as you’ve taken the steps listed above).

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  • You’re right. It’s been a loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong overdue “development.”

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • Thanks! We’re always trying to offer a solution as these new opportunities/responsibilities arise. Musicians don’t need more busy-work. Happy creating!

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • Yeah, totally — at least on the composition rights side of things. For the sound recording, we’ll also have you covered (in a similar way as the YouTube Content ID program works). So it’s like two of our services working in conjunction to collect both revenue streams.

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • In theory most of the publishers will have license agreements in place, so I believe the majority of the songs people are covering will be monetized on the composition side of things — and thus, safe to post to Facebook. Again, this hasn’t been launched yet, so we’ll see how cover songs are ID’d and monetized shortly, but my assumption is that it will work similar to YouTube, where Content ID tries to recognize and monetize covers for the publisher.

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • In theory most of the publishers will have license agreements in place, so I believe the majority of the songs people are covering will be monetized on the composition side of things — and thus, safe to post to Facebook. Again, this hasn’t been launched yet, so we’ll see how cover songs are ID’d and monetized shortly, but my assumption is that it will work similar to YouTube, where Content ID tries to recognize and monetize covers for the publisher.

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • BMI only collects performance royalties; they do not collect mechanical royalties, ad revenue payments through Content ID, sync license fees, etc.

    In order for CD Baby to collect for Facebook usages of your music, you’d need to do two things: 1) make sure you’re opted into our YouTube monetization program — to collect for the sound recording, and 2) opt in for CD Baby Pro Publishing — to collect for the songwriter/publishing portion of the revenue.

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • BMI only collects performance royalties. Without a publishing rights administrator such as CD Baby Pro Publishing, you’re missing out on mechanical royalties generated from international downloads, global streams, and more.

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.

  • No. SoundExchange doesn’t collect publishing royalties. They collect a digital performance royalty (for non-interactive streams) that is tied to the actual recording, not the underlying composition. So SoundExchange royalties get paid to labels, artists, players, etc. Publishing royalties get paid to songwriters, and that’s the piece that CD Baby Pro Publishing helps with. That distinction being made, I always recommend artists register with SoundExchange AND have someone administering their publishing rights (if they’re also a songwriter).

    Follow me to the end of the rainbow on Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter and get a free PDF of my poetry chapbook: I Say Potato, You Say Apocalypse.