“Musician Advice” Articles

6 ways to persuade people to sign up for your band’s email newsletter

January 27, 2015{ No Comments }

Email Newsletter Tips for Musicians[This post was written by Hugh Mcintyre and it originally appeared on the SonicBids Blog.]

These days, everybody’s email inboxes are fuller than ever, and people are becoming more and more selective about what newsletters they sign up for. If it doesn’t truly seem like something they want to read or provide some real value to them, most decide not to bother – which is a shame for any band with a well-done newsletter. Getting people to sign up for your newsletter (even if they identify as a fan) can be tricky, but it certainly isn’t impossible. Here are six tips that could help you.

1. Make it easy

If you’ve been able to convince someone to sign up for your newsletter, make sure it’s as simple and fast as possible. I personally have gone to sign up for ones that end up asking too many questions or have more than a few steps, and I end up backing out before I get all the way through the process. Read more »

5 ways to actively grow your fanbase

January 26, 2015{ No Comments }

Concert Crowd[This article was written by Dave Kusek, founder of the New Artist Model, an online music business school for independent musicians, performers, recording artists, producers, managers, and songwriters. He is also the founder of Berklee Online, co-author of The Future of Music book, and a member of the team who brought midi to the market.]

Today, there are countless ways to get your music out there. Simply putting your music up on YouTube, Facebook, or an internet radio will help fuel organic discovery. However, as you probably already know, this process can be slow and tedious. You may only reach a few new people and these impressions are often one-off with no opportunity to reconnect. For the most part, these platforms excel at keeping your current fans informed and engaged, but when it comes to actually growing your fanbase they tend to be more of a passive approach.

If you want to get more fans, you need to be taking a more active approach. Fluence is a platform that allows you to actively submit your music and videos to influencers and curators for feedback. If they like your music, they may share with their following or give you a great opportunity to be featured on their blog or play a show. Read more »

On Girls, Marnie shows us exactly how NOT to handle a tough crowd

January 26, 2015{ No Comments }

How NOT to handle a crowd
Do you watch the HBO show Girls? If you do, you probably already know where I’m going with this. If you don’t, I’ll give you a quick recap of a recent cringe-worthy, awkward, highly-uncomfortable-but-ultimately-kind-of-funny scene – one that we can all learn a valuable (though admittedly basic) lesson from.

Marnie (played by Alison Williams) has been writing songs – or lyrics at least – with her guitar-playing friend Desi (Ebon Moss-Bachrach).

The songs are deeply personal, gentle in their execution (acoustic guitar, two-part harmonies), and ideal for an audience that plans to hang on her every sappy word. Because those audiences exist when you’ve never played a gig before, right?

To Marnie and Desi’s credit, they choose a “Jazz Brunch” at a local fine-ish dining establishment to unveil their duo proper. Seems like it’d be a great place for some delicate acoustic music, right? Nah. Read more »

Smash any goal for 2015 using the Seinfeld Strategy

January 22, 2015{ 5 Comments }

Jerry Seinfeld's producivity secretJerry Seinfeld is arguably one of the most successful comedians of our time. Wealthy beyond words, he ran his smash hit show ‘Seinfeld’ year after year which snapped up countless awards and all without ever running short of material.

So how did he do it? The answer is actually much simpler than you may think and it’s a proven method to helping you effectively smash any goal you set for 2015.

Jerry’s secret strategy?

He used a system whereby he would aim to write one joke every day. That’s it – just one joke. Not five, not ten just one.

Once he’d written his joke he would place a big red cross over that day on his calendar and after a few days of doing this a chain would form. The system then became about not breaking the chain, rather than the joke itself. Read more »

Does anyone actually discover music on Twitter?

January 21, 2015{ 8 Comments }

How NOT to Promote Your Music on TwitterHip hop blogger Mike Trampe wrote an interesting article you might want to check out about online music promotion called “5 Things Rappers Shouldn’t Be Doing on Social Media.”

It’s all good stuff, but the part that really made me think was this:

STOP sending your music links to people on on twitter (unless they asked), especially celebrities and industry vets. I get shown new music all the time from friends, family and industry colleagues. You know the first question I ask them? “How did you find out about the artist.” And not ONE TIME have they said from being “sent” a music link on twitter. People in general, but especially busy industry people do not have the time to listen to all the music being sent to them via twitter mentions. So why waste the time to send your music to a bunch of random people hoping they click it? That’s not promoting, marketing or social media. That’s one word. SPAMMING. Stop being lazy, do your research and learn how to market your music properly. Google is free, libraries are free, knowledge is free. Educate yourselves or get left behind.

Read more »

What makes a great CD Baby music product page?

January 20, 2015{ No Comments }

How to optimize your music page on CD BabySomeone has landed on the CD Baby page for your album or single. You’re close to making a sale.

Your potential fan has either found your music by:

* browsing on cdbaby.com.

* searching for you online.

* linking from a website, email newsletter, or social.

Now it’s time to “close the deal.” (That really is an awful saying, isn’t it? But you get the point.)

How to optimize your CD Baby album or single page to make the best impression

Read more »

CD Baby will handle new VAT changes for EU artists

January 19, 2015{ No Comments }

VAT changes will not affect CD Baby artistsHave recent changes to EU tax law got you down? Don’t worry, CD Baby is handling it for you!

Many of our European artists have worried about how a new law in the EU concerning VAT (value-added tax) will affect them.

The short answer (at least in terms of your sales on CD Baby) is: not at all!

We will be collecting and remitting the VAT for the sale of all downloads on cdbaby.com (FLAC, MP3, etc.) on behalf of our artists and label clients in the 28 EU countries.

If you live in the EU, the VAT will be paid by your customer and will not affect what you make on sales of downloads from CD Baby. This will save you from having to worry about reporting and remitting the VAT yourself. Read more »

What do teens really think about the big social networks?

January 14, 2015{ 4 Comments }

What do teens think about the big social networks?How are teens using the big social platforms when it comes to building relationships, sharing media, and discovering music?

Well, maybe a better question to ask yourself first is: do you care?

If your fanbase is comprised mostly of motorcycle-loving retirees, then what a 19-yr-old has to say about Vine will not have much effect on your music career.  Go where your fans are!

But if your music does appeal to teens, it’s important to understand how your fans are communicating online, and how each network helps them shape and showcase their own identities.

Heck, even if you attract an older audience you might be interested in what teenagers think about various social networks since it’ll inevitably shape how we ALL use the Internet in years to come.

If you’re curious, check out this article from Andrew Watts — an actual, ya know, teen.. who’s “extremely interested in social media’s role in our society as well as how it is currently evolving.”

The real scoop on how teens use Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, Tumblr, G+, Vine, YouTube, and more

Watts goes into detail about how each network functions, the habits of its users, and why those features make it a relevant or forgettable online tool. Check out his article for the full picture, but here are some interesting quotes about the more widely known platforms:

Facebook — “It’s dead to us. Facebook is something we all got in middle school because it was cool but now is seen as an awkward family dinner party we can’t really leave.” Read more »

7 things you can do with CD Baby’s Music Player that you can’t do with a Bandcamp player

January 14, 2015{ 1 Comment }

Music players compared: CD Baby and Bandcamp

Showcase and sell your music on any website

Let me get this out of the way upfront: I think Bandcamp is great. I’ve put all my albums up there and I love their service. I’ve even used their player to share individual songs on my blog.

But over the past couple years we’ve heard from a lot of artists who want to be able to do more with their music players, all in one place, all with one tool.

We listened to what they wanted, and then we built our new CD Baby Music Player (available for FREE)!

With CD Baby’s Music Player, you can…

1. Create and save an unlimited number of customizable, mobile-friendly music players to embed on any website and share online. Read more »

5 tips to get a knockout vocal in your next recording session

January 13, 2015{ No Comments }

How to record a great vocal performance[This article was written by professional voice teacher and vocal producer Arden Kaywin.]

I’ve been a voice teacher and vocal producer for many years now and one of the things I’ve noticed from working with singer/songwriters is that they often don’t give the same kind of advanced focus and preparation to their vocals as they do to the songwriting and production of their songs.

It’s easy to believe that since you wrote the song and have been singing it throughout the writing/production process that your vocals will be ready when it comes time to record. That is true to a degree: you will be ready. But there’s a difference between giving a “ready” performance and giving a “knockout” performance.

Here are some insights into my work with singers to help them access that “knockout” performance

1. You are NOT a singer, you are a storyteller

In my experience, many of the things that trip up a singer vanish when the singer is really immersed in telling the story of the song. Read more »