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Why social media marketing isn’t the answer for indie musicians

[This article was written by Eric Eckhart, an American indie singer-songwriter and producer based in Berlin, Germany.] 

I’ve been part of the DIY musical community for nearly 10 years, creating my own label, booking agency, PR team, being active in social media and speaking at conferences and writing blogs on how to survive and thrive as an independent musician.

But lately, I have been talking with colleagues about the approach we have been advocating over the years and I have come to some new conclusions.

The pressure to break through the noise as an independent musician has led many of us to allow our focus to be skewed.

While we were posting, tweeting and instagraming, being manager, publicity director and booking agent, maybe we should have been spending more time delving into the deepest part of our creative selves to reach for greatness.

Maybe spending the time and energy needed to be a modern DIY musician is not worth the loss of time being creative. Because no amount of social media activity can ever substitute for writing a great song.

The hard honest truth is this – the reason many of us have not had the breakthrough we desire is our songs haven’t been great enough. Not because we didn’t have the right social media approach.

I’ve made good music, sometimes even with a hint of possible greatness, but not enough great music. Getting yourself in that headspace and that soulspace to write a great song, and I mean a seriously great song, is no easy feat.

For DIY musicians like us to succeed, writing just good songs will never cut it. We have to be better. We have to write better, sing better, record better, play better and most importantly never stop reaching for the greatness that lives within us all.

We are meant to be the new pioneers of rock music. We are the underground, the undiscovered, the untamed. We are meant to reinvent, push boundaries and discover our true artistic selves and constantly explore deeper.

So, close that laptop, shut off the smartphone, find a quiet space and allow the time, the struggle and the possible heartbreaking amount of work needed to channel that magic that some of use will get to be a conduit for that brings inescapable musical beauty into the world.

I’m ready to be a channel for bringing great music into the world. If I can do that, I believe the rest will sort itself out.

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[Guitarist picture from Shutterstock.]

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  • audiolfm

    In this i ma not in your favor because we should publish our music on social media. It may be possible that anyone musician hire us for singing. We can get the platform from Social media.
    http://www.lfmaudio.com/services/video/

  • I agree… It’s not really about reading statistics about how often you should tweet, or which social network is the best… The fact is it’s so easy now to share content, any music fan will share a great song if he finds one, that’s all. You have to be found of course, it’s not easy to be seen among all the DIY inde music that exists these days but if the music is worth it, it will be found and shared 😉

  • Keef Keyz Coston

    This is a good article, you have a very good take on this. Being a musician, artist, or music producer we often fall in the “marketing traps” or the social media traps and we forget that what separates us from the these other industries is that we are creative and our creativity is what makes us. We still need to market ourselves and become very social but if marketing and online social surfing takes up more time than creating then we are diminishing our creativity and our craft. Every great musician and artist isn’t great just because of good marketing, they spend their time on being great and then markets their greatness.
    Great article!

    http://www.keefkeyz.com

  • I agree. There are so many social platforms out there that it is easy to get lost in the noise of keeping them all up to date rather than working on your craft.

  • I agree. There are so many social platforms out there that it is easy to get lost in the noise of keeping them all up to date rather than working on your craft.

  • Music doesn’t suddenly go viral without it being placed in a medium for which ‘viral’ is possible. At some point, when “the struggle and the possible heartbreaking amount of work needed to channel that magic” has been completed the DIY musician will still have to deal with the proverbial vehicle to drive the music above the noise. So, while it’s solid advice to turn the tech off in exchange for much needed solitude, the tech is needed to convey the music to the world. Perhaps the best guidance is to have a committed friend with tech-savy to lead that charge. It’s the musicians that are “islands” that live alone in their paradise.

  • Oldnewbie

    It is hard to be everything at once. Add in recording engineer and the creative process gets further pushed into a ‘[corner’. Peter Wolf of the J. Geils band once said “You’re either a musician or a manager” and that people or bands that try to manage themselves find they either are great at one and not so at the other. I have had very talented friends build home studios, striving to go beyond the limits of a home studio, and completely stop writing songs. My advice… stay creative as much as possible. Yes we have to promote ourselves but with online media and online advertising it isn’t that time consuming. Never forget why you are bothering in the first place!

  • If you want to be successful financially, the likelihood is that you’ll either have to spend significant time marketing, or find someone to do it for you. It’s naive to think otherwise. There is a balance, of course. The greatest song in the world won’t be good enough if no one hears it. All the marketing in the world might not help you if you and your songs suck. So, I think a good question is, “Where is the most effective use of our time in marketing our music?” Social media — maybe a good use, maybe not.

    • I agree with Keith. I started performing professionally at 16 I’m now 70 and still recording originals and selling them at live shows (we do 150-200 a year). I’ve had songs placed on major network tv shows, movies and other small successes. I’ve studied hard the industry’s format for writing a great song and I’ve written songs that I and industry pros have considered hits. While creating a great song (a great song boils down to opinions) is extremely important, if it (or the act) isn’t marketed properly the song will just be popular with your friends and relatives. For me, I’ve found that performing the song (s) live at shows creates a point of purchase that creates sales. Placing songs on tv shows gets royalties and buy outs. I couple that with airplay and media coverage marketing. I grew up opening for name acts when Rock n roll was an infant. The days of am and fm, allen freed, dick clark and bill graham have passed. The artist/songwriter today has to be inventive and think out of the box. http://www.crystalimageband.weebly.com Just my opinion and what works for me.

      • Jun Friend

        With the 2 actual rock groups I’m in, already getting paid for a gig is something. Half the time it seems in Belgium that coming with the material passing hours and days of rehearsal, creating original songs and entertaining a crowd is “no work at all” and doesn’t need retribution…
        We always have a few CDs too. True these often get sold… it’s not much, more they wouldn’t go, but it is an entry indeed. I agree with you sir 🙂 until now, I’ve tried all that didn’t request investing big money nor having “big” contacts and only concerts and CD (even a simple 4 songs demo) really have a result : feedback & efficient fan-targetting through a group of people instead of individual chatting for e.g., for the concerts and festivals and any kind of event we can go play at. and usually when people had a good evening they like to say “thank you” by buying your CD if it’s not too expensive 🙂 I do the same with groups I discover myself so … logic lol.

        thanks allot John, you gave me a bit of hope back 🙂 Made me rethink and review… definitively the only “ways” that actually work these 2. should concentrate on finding how ever where ever a place an event to sing at in solo and make sure that I have a few CDs along to sell that day. Start building from there 🙂

  • michael wark

    I’m ready to be a channel for bringing great music into the world. If I can do that, I believe the rest will sort itself out..what a great last sentence,sometimes it do’s feel like we are channeling music from the universe not just from our heads..

  • michael wark

    I’m ready to be a channel for bringing great music into the world. If I can do that, I believe the rest will sort itself out..what a great last sentence,sometimes it do’s feel like we are channeling music from the universe not just from our heads..

    • Kim Thompsett

      That ‘tapped into the ether’ thing almost always happens when I write a song, and for me, quality will always win over quantity. But a good studio sound engineer who can help you present your songs in a symbiotic but commercially appealing way is priceless. I’m not really sure that a promoter or manager will help, as so much of this success seems to be as much about the luck of tapping into a local/national/global zeitgeist as it does about song quality and musical talent. If the magic is there, best to let it flow, and think more about ‘sharing your discovery with others’ than hard sell promotion. 🙂

  • Thanks for the feedback everyone! Always a great feeling to have fellow musicians get what you are saying!

  • Many musicians now a days probably do spend too much time on social media in what they believe is “marketing” when it’s really just spamming. And although I am an advocate of continually developing your craft to it’s greatest potential, after living in Nashville it’s not always about skill. I’ve seen some amazing singer/songwriters who should have record deals, but don’t. I’ve seen amazing singer/songwriters who had music deals, but they couldn’t get their music off the ground because they had no marketing plan in place. It’s true that there are some musicians who need to spend some more time working on their craft, but that is still no guarantee of success. The best course of action is to yes, practice everyday, and also to learn as much about marketing your music you possibly can so you can get your stuff out there. There are solutions that don’t have to cost you money in the beginning, but you have to know what you are doing. If you don’t you can forget it, it will take your whole career to figure it out and you don’t have that kind of time to waste. That’s why I suggest learning as much as you can about marketing your music.

    Here’s one of the posts I wrote on how to sell you music online. There’s also a link to a free eBook on the page. http://buildingabrandonline.com/MusiciansEmpowered/how-to-sell-my-music-online/

  • One approach might be to take a release/ tour angle. Turn the phone off, make great music, when the album or song is done spend the next few weeks promoting it via social media and gigs (if gigs are available to you), but set a deadline. After the deadline shut back down and focus on the music again. I think Eric is right. Endless social media will return fewer and fewer dividends, especially if it’s at the cost of new, great, better than ever music.

  • One approach might be to take a release/ tour angle. Turn the phone off, make great music, when the album or song is done spend the next few weeks promoting it via social media and gigs (if gigs are available to you), but set a deadline. After the deadline shut back down and focus on the music again. I think Eric is right. Endless social media will return fewer and fewer dividends, especially if it’s at the cost of new, great, better than ever music.

  • Dave

    It really is not just about great songs, it is about that, and your image and work ethic and your ability to find someone in the business that believes in you. Miss any of that and you are not going to be making money with your music. There have been many more great songs written than we will ever know but the ones that are written by people that are driven and skilled networkers will always get heard.

  • I don’t know You listen to some of this crap that makes it to main stream radio and much of it is all about marketing.

  • Scott

    There are a plethora of AMAZING songs out there no one is listening to due to the noize. I think the sentiment of the article is genuine, however, no matter how great a song is nobody will ever know if they don’t A: know about B: listen to it.

  • Sage Schwarm

    Publicity, etc. has always played a huge role in the music industry. Now it is almost the only thing that matters if you want anybody to hear your music and/or give a crap. Twenty years ago, if you were the BEST BAND IN THE WORLD you had at best a 30% chance of actually getting famous – which are terrible odds – but now being the best band has almost nothing to do with it. Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to be good at what you do, it just has nothing to do with becoming famous. All you have to do is turn on the radio, T.V. etc. to see that. REALLY bad bands and solo artists can be huge while often really good artists get relatively nowhere. This is due to publicists, publicity stunts, and self-promotion. It is what it is… We live in the present, not the past. The POINT OF ALL OF THIS is you have to strive to be both the best musician/songwriter/producer you can be while also playing the publicity game the best you can. Every now and then a really talented artist makes it big. There’s still hope.

  • Jarrod

    A very well-written article. Maybe we should all ask if we have created something worth spreading before we spread it. Good job, Eric.

  • Xan Angelfvkk

    Well said. Social media “marketing” has about the lowest bang for you buck (in this case the “buck” is TIME) you can get. Worst still, it provides a too easy platform to compare yourself to others which never results in anything useful. And we all know that some even fake their ratings.

  • Paul Hoyle

    I have been making a living as a Music Producer/ Songwriter for over 30 years, I have lived in the 80’s where there were no Social Media outlets, so I think everyone should take advantage of the fact that with Social Media today your music and your videos are shown to millions of people. I agree that you need to spend time to write GREAT songs, but many artists have the songs but do not know how to show them to the world. Take the time to show what you are great about!

  • Jack Ramsey

    Yeah, I wrote a song along these lines called “DIY Suicide”.

  • lf

    “The hard honest truth is this – the reason many of us have not had the breakthrough we desire is our songs haven’t been great enough.”

    Wrong! The TRUTH is that the popular musical landscape over the last 25 years is abysmal. Generations to come will have NOTHING worth listening to in the future. It’s almost all complete garbage driven by greed and ignorance.

    There are very few people that can call themselves musicians. These so called “artists” today became successful because they had a big checkbook behind them, and they sell other things i.e. fashion, clothing, headphones, etc. Otherwise, they are absolutely repugnant and vapid.

    Perhaps there was a time when musicians actually had a say in the business, or even independent DJs in privately owned radio stations. Not too long ago, being a “professional” musician was actually a solid white collar job. That’s no longer the case. Corporate conglomerates now corrupt the system and an age of interminable ignorance and bad taste is upon us.

    • Nihar Savala

      I agree, so mush of the music out there is not inspiring & some not even pleasing to our ears (And I do understand therez good music being created & that one has to search/lookout for good stuff)

      I had a tweet recently in my TL from Jesse Cannon which shares the same thought “The only thing worse than bad music getting popular in the present day, is people’s excitement for it ten years later”

    • Jun Friend

      Did allot of contests of all sorts being a singer that loves sharing music, all gigs are good and if it means trying out those shows to have a start of fanbase as a solo singer, so be it. Being a little older than the average participant to those contests and having a “personality” I usually get kicked out after pre-selections. Indeed and as one of the auditors that did my “audition in one of those said : I’ve got it all ; the voice the breathing, the emotion, the charisma, the entertaining spirit,… BUT I’m not malleable enough for them… in other words I’m not a puppet with nice legs that will sing what ever the producers impose me to sing, but well the unique personna with a deep expression of emotions…

      Now days I stopped applying in this contests. Not that the particular remark there cutted me or anything… Today I’m 37 years old… other point where I’m not eligible anymore to be promoted as a singer… For a guitarist or a drummer or a piano player, the older you get, if you’re good, the more respect and admiration and requests (cause people go with the idea “age makes wiseness more probable) you’ll get from others, fans, surroundings, pros, other musicians… When you’re a signer and your voice is your main instrument, it seems maturity is a Big NO NO if you want to get out there…

      Marketing-Music is killing the “ART” that is Music. Profit is killin inspiration…
      I’m searching and searching and analyzing so many websites, forums, articles and posts on the subject and up to now, still didn’t find a way to promote my voice without a penny to invest in my own pocket nor the wanting to be a manger and passing more time on marketing than what I really love doing ; singing.
      Still it drives me crazy that multitude of supports and the lake of efficency of each one if you don’t invest money or ALLOT of time on it only.

  • Atom Crews

    I disagree. Yes, you need to put 110% effort into your craft to create the best product possible. But you can have the most amazing song in the world and unless you can find a way to break through all the noise of social media, no one will ever hear it. Period. It’s also not the “good ol days” anymore where a radio station or record label will take a chance on an artist and put all their money behind them. Bands and artists need to start thinking of themselves as a brand with a product: their music. Pushing ourselves to make great music is only half the battle in today’s world…

  • Atom Crews

    I disagree. Yes, you need to put 110% effort into your craft to create the best product possible. But you can have the most amazing song in the world and unless you can find a way to break through all the noise of social media, no one will ever hear it. Period. It’s also not the “good ol days” anymore where a radio station or record label will take a chance on an artist and put all their money behind them. Bands and artists need to start thinking of themselves as a brand with a product: their music. Pushing ourselves to make great music is only half the battle in today’s world…

  • Darrell G Looney

    Nowadays, the music industry is one big catch 22. You suck if you cannot breakthrough the noise to get “famous”. Doing so with the help of a major label can be detrimental to your career. You cannot breakthrough the noise to get famous without being heard – by the right people who are today’s “tastemakers”. Who those folks are in YOUR genre of music remains a mystery to those who don’t know. That’s why so many musicians use social media and submission sites such as ReverbNation, MusicXray and SonicBids as well as others as opportunity aggregators. A deeper truth is that if fans of music would simply support the musicians they like with a single paid download, or adding them to their Spotify/Pandora/RDio etc. playlists (don’t pay much but it’s more than zero) instead of looking to get music for free in general, there would be more resources in the hands of musicians to allow them to pursue the depths of their art.

  • Glasgow Reggae Jam

    Good article i believe i am one of the guilty ones ,every time i go networking i get lost in thr bubble and once u start listening to shared music u start changing yo original production doubting yo own creativity now i see why eminem once said he does not listen to any other songs when he is about to make an album

  • manager@isc.co.nz

    There is that famous saying: What happens if you don’t promote yourself? Answer: Nothing.

  • Last time I commented here on the cdbaby blog I said the same thing, more or less… simply put. Create your own music website!

    Where your band or whatever collab you’re part of, post all the stuff you want to go public. Maintain the band domain name through the years and you’ll discover that many of the social media networks change, get sold, bought, people switch to new ones, discontinued etc, all while you and your band website is just there, ready and available for whomever figures out that is the place to go. If one keep it up and regularly add new content the search engines will pick up and substantially help with the so much needed Internet presence.

    Only one place to worry about and minimal social media approach = more time left over for making what you’re best at… MUSIC 🙂

    But, as mentioned in comments, to actually become “popular” some form of marketing is needed. Can’t win the lottery without even buying a ticket. Now the question is; does marketing have to be so strongly integrated with the Internet? Offline promotion can be as effective… live gigs, public pranks etc.

  • Aidan D Warnock

    One of the best articles I have read, thanks a lot for taking the time to write it. I have spent to much time on social media instead of creating too.

  • RASHAUN WALKER

    What better quiet space in your head than when your surrounded by everything.. 🙂 Rock On Music family

    KMG

  • Eric John Kaiser

    Interesting point. Thanks Eric. I agree with Keith, it should be a balance. “Art is making something out of nothing and selling it” Frank Zappa. Art and business are two different adventures, that don’t always get along very well… Is Art still art if you don’t share it and sell it ?

  • Eric John Kaiser

    Interesting point. Thanks Eric. I agree with Keith, it should be a balance. “Art is making something out of nothing and selling it” Frank Zappa. Art and business are two different adventures, that don’t always get along very well… Is Art still art if you don’t share it and sell it ?

  • Eric John Kaiser

    I agree. It should be a balance. 🙂

  • Roy Jones

    The fact is there is now more competition than ever in the music business. Technology and the internet have made it easier and cheaper to produce and distribute high quality recordings and so the quantity of recorded music out there has never been greater. So this means that if you don’t have a supportive fan base in place its very difficult to attract attention to your music. I think that this means you should be very self critical of your song writing and as this blog suggests make sure what you release is absolutely exceptional. To use Tom Robinson’s analogy you have to get into orbit with a really great song. Once you’re in orbit people will get into your other work. If you think you’ve reached this standard then marketing is also a crucial aspect of getting yourself heard and social media, Facebook adds, website and pro-emails, twitter, good photos and artworks, cultivating friends in blogs of your genre and radio stations, you know what I mean. it’s hard but its got to be done and even with all that you still need the third variable, luck!

  • Mixtape Cover King

    This is true but you have to promote your music still no matter what to get it to the world. I work with thousands of musicians and I always have them get set up with a virtual assistant who will promote their music on all the music sites, blogs, social media and more here is an informative article that teaches artist about music marketing virtual assistants Learn How To Automate Your Music Marketing

  • Social media is definitely not the 80/20 for independent musicians. It’s the music itself, personal network, live performances, and the email list.

    Too much is said about marketing and not enough about creating the music. I think it’s possible to get to the point where the basics of marketing/creation/business are second nature and so a better management of time follows.

  • Thanks for commenting. Speaking of fake ratings, I just posted this (not sure if you’ve seen it): http://diymusician.cdbaby.com/2015/02/1-reason-never-pay-likes-fans-views-subscribes/

    @ChrisRobley

  • Patrick Dunn

    Word for word, I completely relate to this. Even as I type this comment, I’m thinking, “Better use my Twitter login to comment…”

    I don’t think Eric is saying DIY artists should completely blow off marketing/promotion/etc., whether via social media or other means. Anyone who has been in this game for 10+ years, as he has, isn’t going to suddenly go off the grid and expect commercial success to find him in his hole of songwriting brilliance that he’s dug with his newfound time.

    I think that maybe, if you recommit to your artist self first, spending the time to pursue the “greatness” Eric mentions, then the time you DO spend on marketing/social media will be more effective. You will be a real person with something real to say, as opposed to chasing the latest marketing/social media trends. Not that there’s anything wrong with marketing/social media — hell, it’s my day job — but I do believe that authenticity goes a lot further than “best practices.”

  • Patrick Dunn

    Word for word, I completely relate to this. Even as I type this comment, I’m thinking, “Better use my Twitter login to comment…”

    I don’t think Eric is saying DIY artists should completely blow off marketing/promotion/etc., whether via social media or other means. Anyone who has been in this game for 10+ years, as he has, isn’t going to suddenly go off the grid and expect commercial success to find him in his hole of songwriting brilliance that he’s dug with his newfound time.

    I think that maybe, if you recommit to your artist self first, spending the time to pursue the “greatness” Eric mentions, then the time you DO spend on marketing/social media will be more effective. You will be a real person with something real to say, as opposed to chasing the latest marketing/social media trends. Not that there’s anything wrong with marketing/social media — hell, it’s my day job — but I do believe that authenticity goes a lot further than “best practices.”

  • Patrick Dunn

    Word for word, I completely relate to this. Even as I type this comment, I’m thinking, “Better use my Twitter login to comment…”

    I don’t think Eric is saying DIY artists should completely blow off marketing/promotion/etc., whether via social media or other means. Anyone who has been in this game for 10+ years, as he has, isn’t going to suddenly go off the grid and expect commercial success to find him in his hole of songwriting brilliance that he’s dug with his newfound time.

    I think that maybe, if you recommit to your artist self first, spending the time to pursue the “greatness” Eric mentions, then the time you DO spend on marketing/social media will be more effective. You will be a real person with something real to say, as opposed to chasing the latest marketing/social media trends. Not that there’s anything wrong with marketing/social media — hell, it’s my day job — but I do believe that authenticity goes a lot further than “best practices.”

  • “We are meant to be the new pioneers of rock music.” SIGHHHHHH…

  • good morning

    you made some thoughtful points, but would this be directed to a person whom is on social media a great portion of their day? We live in a technologically advanced world and as john covert said”The days of am and fm, allen freed, dick clark and bill graham have passed” and he is truly right. You need to have Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumbler a proper website; your music should be on soundcloud, zambah, itunes, radio streaming, you should be blogging etcetera. Definitely has to be a balance but what is a balancing act without the whole circus? you have to be your own booking agent, your own sales rep, your own manager, your own promoter, sound engineer, financier etc etc etc on top of that you have millions of other people on social media who have their own band, their own solo act and website. I think there is a loss of connection towards quality music because there is so much put in our faces (im born in the early nineties) that we don’t have a clue as to what to listen. And who’s to say what is quality and otherwise? Do we use american idol as a basis? or is it the major labels that tell us what is good and who we should listen to? I hope there are other like minded musicians and people out there with the same concerns

    things done changed

  • Ray Paule Patrick

    if we are passionate about the art we create we should be just as passionate in promoting it.
    I do not see the connection between the time we put into creating our art and the time we put into promoting it, there is no point in promoting something that has no real content or passion in it the first place,
    Art comes first, promotion should gladly sit as passionately along side the art and if the art was created from the depths of deepest expression that WILL ignite interest in the art.
    RPP

  • Sara Carbone

    I like that point Keith made about the balance – as a mom with two kids and so very little time, I have to pick and choose – it ends up being a little here, a little there. But ultimately I do love sitting in a room, just musing on stuff, creating songs.. Yum.

  • Absolutely. Stealing time when we can!

    @ChrisRobley

  • Absolutely. Stealing time when we can!

    @ChrisRobley

  • Ove Bjørn Karlsen

    No. I have worldclass production. Its not that. There is a regression in the music industry, to bellydancer level, where there is no sense or real economic flow, because the establishment is missing.

  • Thank you for the article.

    However… it`s not that simple…
    Sure talant matters! But… if you can`t promote yourself and find your niche even a great song can slip into obscurity. Right time, right place and right people are also important i`m afraid…

    Actually labels themselves mentioned that talanat doesn`t cost much nowadays but the connection and PR(((.
    But, as for me, I prefer to be tallented than to be nothing even having great connections))).
    Thank you again, there is something here to think about anyway…

  • This has got to be the stupidest blog post I have ever read in my entire life. A do the social media marketing yourself – – BECAUSE IT’S 2016 – – or hire someone had have a real team to do it for you. Just sitting in a dark fkng room “writing the best music ever in your opinion because you have not a d*mn clue on what anyone else thinks about it” is ASININE!!!!! You think just a website will work or just youtube… THINK AGAIN – It is 2016 – direct mailers do not work, email does not work, a stand alone website DOES NOT WORK and if you think it does, you’ll be spending a MILLION more hours getting the site seen than having a simple social media presence on the top 5 platforms. You don’t go viral if you have no one that sees your craft. You will not get signed by a major label or private label that is undersigned to a larger one WITHOUT A SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE. It will NEVER HAPPEN – it is A MUST IN AN ELECTRONIC PRESS KIT to even book shows and to get signed to anything!!!!!!! Don’t be stupid…………

  • A realization I have to get into my head too often. You can promote and market “ok” music all day, but that won’t turn the “ok” music into “great” music. Keep grinding everybody. Thanks for the article Eric.

  • Jun Friend

    Hello,
    If it were that simple I’d be Jaming with Madonna by now…
    I practice every single day, got a part job so the other part I can do my Real Job ; being a singer and still be able to feed myself with the “normal secretary job”.

    I have no family nor rich relatives nor an heritance what so ever. don’t have contacts placed in areas like Artist marketing or promotion. So on the part “investing money to promote yourself” may it be throught some else you’ll have to pay of course or by loosing 2/3 of your time through S.M. and all possible publishing and promoting sites where the free services of course don’t promote you much out there to others than your “already friends”
    So If money is the only Mandatory request, I’ll never get to share music with a large public.

    I’ve been singing in different rock groups the past 18 years latest being Lazylemon (original compo) and Cover me Mad (covers) and doing as much concerts as possible with them.

    I’m 37Years old and it seems that singers that age are totally “too old” to be taken in account in contests like “new stars ” or “Star Accademy”… anyways I’m not “Malleable” enough for them as one of those interviewers told me once… and Solo, as a 37yo singer, you can be as good as you want, you can’t Get a gig anywhere in Belgium or the surrounding countries (yes not shy either to cross boarders, anything as long as it gets me there)

    As for “motivation” or “publishing content” : developped websites for each group, for me in solo I have even 3 different websites, created about 30-40 good songs with the different groups got a youtube channel with about 40 homemade covers on it, am on shoutcast, FB pages, Tweeter, etc etc etc. I’m really in each and every one of those Skyrock, myspace, blogger, etc. all. As long as you don’t “PAY” none is really top noch to promote yourself or again you’ve got to pass hours chatting with one fan at a time … it takes a life time to get a fanbase like that and I do also prefer passing all that time recording new songs and doing rehearsals or concerts :p

    So My question for you all and the author of this article is :
    What do you do when your problem is not one of practice nor talent, but well one of money and profitable looks/age and all that BS that shouldn’t be taken in account to recognize talent… ?

  • almark

    There are amazing musicians but no audience. Social media has become a black hole, and yes there are too many so-called musician trying to step over each other. If only musicians would come forward, then we might have some help. It seems like in 2016 that ‘everyone’ wants to be a musician. And everyone is not a musician. Artists are born, not created.

    • Jason Gonzalez

      And that right there is the problem. Since 2005 (when the ability to record music became available to every Tom, Dick, and Harriet who “has a guitar and a dream”), everyone thinks they have talent to write and make music and release it. And most of it is mediocre at best, and awful at worst. And there’s no one to tell these people “Just stop. You don’t have any talent. Go and do something else as a hobby.” There is no artificial gatekeeper to stop the tide anymore. And this is the same thing happening with independent films, people self publishing novels, and the glut of “photographers”.