Music Publishing Unlocked: Your Money is Waiting for You

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Rob Filomena, CD Baby’s former Director of Music Publishing, gave a talk at our 2015 DIY Musician Conference called “Publishing Unlocked: Your Money is Waiting for You,” expanding on some of the music publishing concepts that most affect today’s independent artists and songwriters, including:

* What is music publishing?

* Knowing your music publishing rights, and how you can generate revenue by exploiting your copyright

* The difference between performance royalties and mechanical royalties

* What is a performing rights organization?

* Why BMI and ASCAP are NOT enough

* How your publishing royalties get split

* What is music publishing administration, and why do you need it?

* And much more

After Rob’s talk, a lot of artists in attendance asked to get a copy of his PowerPoint presentation. Here are those slides:

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Are you looking for a professional music publishing administrator you can trust? Check out CD Baby Pro.

Publishing Guide: Get Paid the Money You Are Owed

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  • craig1957

    great

  • This was a really good breakdown of the basic anatomy of the movement of money in music. The only point I feel is necessary to make to help clear up some possible confusion is the section dealing with mechanical royalties. While distributors do pay labels, they don’t really pay a mechanical royalty to the label per se, but they pay to the label the agreed upon percentage of the retail price for each song sold, and within each song sold, or just sale, exists a mechanical royalty which the record label is then obligated by law/contract to pay the music publisher, and the publisher then pays to its writers, per its agreement with its writers, a mechanical royalty, which is either a percentage of full-statutory rate, or some percentage of the then statutory rate. Other than that this is a great breakdown of how money is made in the modern music industry.

  • Yes. Good clarification. And for further clarification, the way you’ve described it is how it works in the US. In many/most other countries, the mechanical royalties for download sales and streaming activity are paid to collection societies, which then distribute those royalties to your publishing administrator — hopefully CD Baby Pro (plug!)

    @ChrisRobley